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A Raposa Matreira

  • Pack Literatura Japonesa (1954-2015)

Pack Literatura Japonesa (1954-2015)

45,00 €  

Inclui: 

  1. YASUNARI KAWABATA - THE SOUND OF THE MOUNTAIN (1954)
  2. SOETSU YANAGI - THE BEAUTY OF EVERYDAY THINGS 
  3. TOSHIKAZU KAWAGUCHI - BEFORE THE COFFEE GETS COLD (2015)
  4. KOBO ABE - THE WOMAN IN THE DUNES (1962)
  5. YUKIKO MOTOYA - PICNIC IN THE STORM (2012)

YASUNARI KAWABATA - THE SOUND OF THE MOUNTAIN

Ogata Shingo is growing old, and his memory is failing him. At night he hears only the sound of death in the distant rumble from the mountain. The relationships which have previously defined his life - with his son, his wife, and his attractive daughter-in-law - are dissolving, and Shingo is caught between love and destruction.

SOETSU YANAGI - THE BEAUTY OF EVERYDAY THINGS

Long revered as the authority on craftsmanship and Japanese aesthetics, Yanagi devoted his life and writing to defend the value of craft. In an age of feeble and ugly machine-made things, The Beauty of Everyday Things is a call to deepen relationships with the objects that surround people.

TOSHIKAZU KAWAGUCHI - BEFORE THE COFFEE GETS COLD

A beautiful, moving story about a small Japanese cafe that offers its visitors the chance to travel back in time, to find an answer to the question: what would you change if you could go back?

KOBO ABE - THE WOMAN IN THE DUNES

Niki Jumpei, an amateur entomologist, searches the scorching desert for beetles. As night falls he is forced to seek shelter in an eerie village, half-buried by huge sand dunes. He awakes to the terrifying realization that the villagers have imprisoned him with a young woman at the bottom of a vast sand pit.

YUKIKO MOTOYA - PICNIC IN THE STORM

Winner of the Akutagawa Prize and the Kenzaburo Oe Prize
A New York Times Book Review Editors' Choice

'In Yukiko Motoya's delightful new story collection, the familiar becomes unfamiliar . . . Certainly the style will remind readers of the Japanese authors Banana Yoshimoto and Sayaka Murata, but the stories themselves?and the logic, or lack thereof, within their sentences?are reminiscent, at least to this reader, of Joy Williams and Rivka Galchen and George Saunders' ?Weike Wang, New York Times Book Review

A housewife takes up bodybuilding and sees radical changes to her physique - which her workaholic husband fails to notice. A boy waits at a bus stop, mocking businessmen struggling to keep their umbrellas open in a typhoon - until an old man shows him that they hold the secret to flying. A woman working in a clothing boutique waits endlessly on a customer who won't come out of the fitting room - and who may or may not be human. A newlywed notices that her husband's features are beginning to slide around his face - to match her own.

In these eleven stories, the individuals who lift the curtains of their orderly homes and workplaces are confronted with the bizarre, the grotesque, the fantastic, the alien - and, through it, find a way to liberation. Winner of the Kenzaburo Oe Prize, Picnic in the Storm is the English-language debut of one of Japan's most fearless young writers.

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